Haematology

Iron Deficiency anaemia

Sometimes, people with iron deficiency anaemia may benefit from additional iron, to help maintain iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis.

This full length edit is taken from a HD 3D stereoscopic movie which shows how intravenous iron preparation can efficiently replace depleted iron stores in patients with iron deficiency anaemia. It consists of a special coating which helps to minimise immunological sensitivity.

The Clotting Cascade (Factor 8)

FVIII is important in the clotting cascade and the generation of the ‘thrombin burst’, which leads to the formation of a haemostatic plug at the site of vascular injury. 

Following injury to a blood vessel, activated platelets aggregate around the site of the injury.

Factor VIII circulating in the blood in a complex with von Willebrand factor is activated by locally generated thrombin.

On the surface of the activated platelets, activated FVIII forms the tenase complex with activated factor nine (IX). This complex activates factor ten (X).

The activated Factor X then forms the prothrombinase complex with activated factor V. This complex rapidly generates thrombin from pro-thrombin creating the so-called thrombin burst

The Clotting Cascade (Factor 9)

The characteristic phenotype in people with haemophilia is the bleeding tendency. Bleeds can occur spontaneously, or as a result of trauma or surgery. In people with haemophilia B the level of factor 9 is low or missing, so it cannot bind with Factor 8 to activate Factor 10. Without Factor 9, the rest of the clotting process cannot continue.

The characteristic phenotype in people with haemophilia is the bleeding tendency.

Bleeds can occur spontaneously, or as a result of trauma or surgery. In people with haemophilia B the level of factor 9 is low or missing, so it cannot bind with Factor 8 to activate Factor 10.

Without Factor 9, the rest of the clotting process cannot continue.